Eating Dutch food in Amsterdam

Should be easy. But it’s actually harder than you’d think. First of all, what is Dutch food? And secondly, where do you buy it?

All I’ve heard about the Dutch cuisine was that it is mostly potatoes, salads or sandwiches. The problem is that you can get that almost anywhere, and once you travel all the way to Amsterdam you might want to try something a little more special than what you can get back home. Luckily for me, I was able to find 2 restaurants where I could have a taste of some Dutch food.

Moeders

Moeders is the Dutch word for mothers, and their philosophy is to serve traditional Dutch food that is just like your mother’s cooking. All the walls are covered in pictures of mothers provided by their customers. Moeders still accepts pictures of mothers. Another unique thing about them is that their cutlery and dishes don’t match. When the restaurant first opened 20+ years ago, they asked their customers to bring their own plates and utensils, which are still used in the restaurant today.

Moeders from the outside.

Moeders from the outside.

Inside the restaurant with framed photos of mothers on the wall.

Inside the restaurant with framed photos of mothers on the wall.

I really liked that you could order a 3 course meal for a fixed price. Just make sure to go to the restaurant hungry because their food is delicious and there’s lots of it! They are almost always full so it is a good idea to make a reservation ahead of time, otherwise your only option might be to sit outside.

Now onto the food!

Farmer's Salad

Farmer’s Salad

Starter - Small egg in the Meadow

Small egg in the Meadow

Main Course - Hotchpotch. Made up of mashed potatoes with sauerkraut, sausage, a meatball and bacon.

Hotchpotch – Made up of mashed potatoes with sauerkraut, sausage, a meatball and bacon.

Main course - Suddervlees. Stewed beef, potatoes and red cabbage.

Suddervlees – Stewed beef, potatoes and red cabbage.

Dessert - Pie of the day

Pie of the day

Dessert - Dutch Delight. Mini-curd, pancakes and spiced ice cream.

Dutch Delight – Mini-curd, pancakes and spiced ice cream.

The Pancake Bakery

Pannekoek, which is the Dutch word for pancake, is also a typical Dutch food. Dutch pancakes are much thinner and larger than the American pancakes and come with a variety of toppings. There are savory ones with meats and vegetables, and sweet ones with fruits, syrup and ice cream.

The Pancake Bakery

The Pancake Bakery

Pancake with ham, cheese and mushroom.

Pancake with ham, cheese and mushroom.

Apple, cinnamon ice cream, cinnamon liqueur and whipped cream pancake.

Apple, cinnamon ice cream, cinnamon liqueur and whipped cream pancake.

Stroopwafel

A stroopwafel is made up of two thin wafers with caramel sauce on the inside. I first encountered this at The Pancake Bakery and fell in love with it.

Stroopwafel from Albert Cuyp Market

Stroopwafel from Albert Cuyp Market

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2 thoughts on “Eating Dutch food in Amsterdam

  1. Pingback: Word of the Day Wednesday: Voorpret | EF Foundation for Foreign Study Mid-Atlantic

  2. Pingback: Love travels to your heart, via your…Stomach.. | The Piggybank Tales

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